Purple is the official color of the Alzheimer's movement. Click here to see how you can "go purple" to help spread awarness about Alzheimer's. Being informed and sharing that info helps everyone by undestand how prevalant Alzheimer's is and how we can deal with it. Click on this link to learn several ways to spread the word and go purple

gopurple

Ideas to Celebrate Alzheimer's & Brain Awareness Month

Go purple at your school or office! Encourage your coworkers or students to wear purple on Monday, June 20. Decorate your breakroom or common area in purple. Hang some streamers and balloons. Post facts about Alzheimer's disease at your workplace, group meeting, or place of worship to raise awareness. Use and wear purple. Everyone loves a casual work day! Make sure to post your purple on social media using the hashtags #GOPURPLE and #ENDALZ.

You can use the following facts to spread awareness. And as always, turn to Mountain Home Care when you need assistance. Suggest us to those you know who are dealing with Alzheimer’s and Dementia in their families. We are here to help!

FACTS

Prevalence:

The number of Americans living with Alzheimer's is growing — and growing fast. An estimated 5.7 million Americans of all ages have Alzheimer’s.

Mortality:

Alzheimer's disease is the only top 10 cause of death in the United States that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed.

Caregivers:

Eighty-three percent of the help provided to older adults in the United States comes from family members, friends or other unpaid caregivers. Nearly half of all caregivers who provide help to older adults do so for someone with Alzheimer's or another dementia.

Teepa Snow does a great job in helping to remove confusion and bring understanding about the differences between Dementia and Alzheimer's. Watch her discuss what dementia actually is in the clip below. When you are ready for more information and need help with a personal family or loved one situation, contact us at Mountain Home Care. We are experts in the field and can guide you through the process. 
Screen Shot 2018 06 01 at 11.48.28 AM

Here are seven tips based on Teepa Snow’s Positive Approach to Care. 

1) Learn more about the disease- Learn what it does and doesn't do and what it is going to mean for you. Everything changes and can be unpredictable. 

2) See it as a journey- It's not a sprint, so plan for the longer journey ahead. 

3) Don’t be a lone ranger- If you try to be you will run out of gas. 

4) Learn “positive approach to care” skills. We can help with this. 

5) Become a care partner instead of just a care giver. If you push help at someone they might push back. Learn to change when something isn't working.

6) Find resources. There is a lot of good info out there. We can also help you with this. 

7) Learn the art of letting go...breathe! Take care of yourself, to take care of others. 

Mountain Home Care is highly-trained in Teepa’s Positive Approach to Care and can help you navigate your way through this journey.

As we approach Memorial Day, many will be gathering with family and enjoying the outdoors. Those who have family members with dementia, whether from Alzheimer’s or other reasons, need to take this opportunity to make their own day special.

The focus of Memorial Day is “memories” and ironically that’s the one area that seems to slip away from those who are aging with dementia. However, if you have family gathering for one day out of the special weekend I’d like to point out some ways to bring your loved one into the action without causing upheaval. Some things to remember when dealing with a dementia patient:

• Let those you know and will be with during your picnic or celebration that your loved one is suffering from dementia. Ask for an extra set of eyes to just keep an eye and make sure that your loved one doesn’t wander. This will let you drop your own guard a little bit.
• Take the time to introduce your loved one to everyone they are sitting by. Remind them who the person is and if possible what relation they are to the person. They may not remember but they won’t feel as lost if you continue to address people by name.
• Remind them who people are. Tell others that when they approach your loved one to let them know who they are, even if they’ve been “introduced” a number of times throughout the day.
• Make sure that before you leave your home your loved one has their clothing marked with their name & your cell phone (which should be kept with you at all times). If they should wander away & the police find them they will look for information on their clothing. If at all possible, have an ID bracelet made for them that is fairly difficult for them to get off. If you can get them to wear all of the time as a part of their daily outfit, it can be a life saver. You don’t have to spend a lot of money for a bracelet engraved with the words Dementia Patient – a contact & if possible their first name. Basically you want to make sure that if they wander off & are found, someone understands that they are a dementia patient and who they belong to.
• Bring items that will keep your loved one busy. Remember that it is often like taking a toddler with you. Most parents would pack a bag of items needed for their child to keep them busy; the same should apply during outings with dementia patients.